Podcast 2: Relating Gray Zone Conflict & Multi-Domain Operations

Welcome to OTH’s second podcast! For this episode we’ve brought together a group of experts to discuss two topics that have consumed Defense policy and academic conversations over the last few years: Multi-Domain Operations and Gray Zone Conflict.

Organising Logistics for Multi-Domain Battle: Making a Complex Problem Even More Complex

Sustaining operations in the hypothesised dispersed and deadly conflict zones of the present and future creates especially acute problems for land forces in multi-domain battle.
By David Beaumont

DROP ZONE: Decision Making

Innovation continues the quest to provide more perfect information and decrease the risk of making an incorrect decision.

Purpose Driven Operations

It is incumbent upon commanders to develop purposes for subordinate operations first and subsequently build the tasks. The “why” trumps the “how” both in importance and in priority.
By Tom Flounders

The Future of Mission Command: an Interview with Mr. Michael McCarthy

The Future of Mission Command: “We conceived a system in the 1990’s that is based on 1980’s technology. There is a groundswell of folks that are saying we need a new approach.”

DROP ZONE: Joint Command and Control

Our Services need to mature and lead the drive to Jointness, both across the DOD and the complex American alliance system

Multi-Domain Battle: Does it End the Never-Ending Quest for Joint Readiness?

Future jointness demands fundamental changes to organizing, training, and equipping the joint force to meet combatant commander multi-domain requirements.
By Mike Benitez

Making Sense of Irregular War

Irregularity in terms of non-uniformed forces and indirect force application describe how the war is fought, not why. While this may seem like academic semantics, it is not.
By Joe Brown

Reflexive Control in Operational Art: Designing Emergent Opportunity in the Vicksburg Campaign

True victory in military operations arises through the acceptance of defeat by one of the antagonists. Despite this, military decision making frequently devolves into analysis of things over thoughts. Grant demonstrated mastery of this concept at Vicksburg.
By Wilford Garvin

DROP ZONE: Looking Backwards in Order to Look Forwards

History may not easily divulge its true lessons. But by objectively analyzing past wars, we can begin to see the commonalities that commanders can exploit to achieve success.

The Problem with “Airpower”

The United States Air Force’s definition of airpower is merely a description of all Air Force activities and is incorrect.
By Tom Flounders

Reflexive Control By Design: Crafting Emergent Opportunity in Complex Systems

Reflexive control theory encourages patterns of strategic thought that increase a leader’s ability to shape environments and defeat an adversary’s strategy.
By Wilford Garvin

DROP ZONE: Reflexive Control in Modern Warfare

Reflexive control is a term that has recently surfaced as a description of Russian strategic and operational planning and goals. However, as a concept it has been around for ages. More coming on Monday.

The Military Design Movement: Drifting towards Embracing Uncertainty and Transformation in Complex Environments

Design, as a multi-disciplinary concept for normative approaches to human decision-making, emphasizes ‘what is possible’ and ‘how a military ought to function’ rather than a highly descriptive and conforming model (termed positivism) where militaries seek to predict future system behavior through past experiences, reductionism, and mechanistic logic.
By Ben Zweibelson